april 2020

photo of Adelaide, a Leicester Longwool sheep and her ram lamb, Isca, at home on Beau Chemin Preservation Farm

Guests: 

Johann Zietsman, Betsy Ross, JoAnn Myers and Ryan Walker

And thank you to Jacko, the lavender araucana cockerel, for the introduction. You can visit Jacko and other rare breeds at the Owl Farm in Wales.

Continue reading “april 2020”

february 2020

Nuffield Scholar, RYAN BOYD is a third generation family farmer from the South Glanton Farm in Manatoba Canada. Ryan is implementing regenerative agricultural practices to improve the soil and water resources. As they diversify with cover crops and livestock the carbon is staying where we like it, in the soil!. http://www.southglantonfarms.com/

GERRY GILLESPIE  has been talking trash for over 25 years; that missing piece in the climate change conversation. His recent Acres USA published book, The Waste Between Our Ears, outlines the progress and possibilities of recycling in our communities and regenerating our soils. https://www.gerrygillespie.net/

My gardening partner, LINDALU MEADOWS, rounds out our February podcast talkin’ story – it’s too early to plant, so we’ve got time to sit a bit…

january 2020

GUESTS:

DR. DAVID C. JOHNSON,  molecular biologist and research scientist at the University of New Mexico, has developed a system that brings lifeless soils back to life by reintroducing beneficial microorganisms to the soil with biologically enhanced compost. https://regenerationinternational.org/bioreactor/

GINA BRIA is an anthropologist and co author of QUENCH who discovered hydration solutions to modern water challenges while researching desert dwellers. https://hydrationfoundation.org/

MICHAEL PILARSKI is a life-long student of plants and earth repair.  https://www.friendsofthetrees.net/

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus you own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.